WTTW Channel 11 - Medical Self-Help Training - "Infant and Child Care" (Part 1, 1963)

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Here's the first part of an edition of an ongoing series called Medical Self-Help Training on WTTW Channel 11, hosted by Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Illinois State Medical Society's (ISMS) Disaster Medical Care Committee. This installment deals with the topic of "Infant and Child Care."

This rare surviving program from the early years of Chicago's "Window to the World" came directly from a 2" Quad tape that was found a few months ago in the basement archives of The Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC). On a recent visit, Rick Klein was touring the facility with head archivist of the MBC John Gieger, and they came upon an unlabeled Quad tape reel that had never been transferred. In a spirit of coorporation, Rick offered to have the tape transferred and for both museums to share the contents. "Who knows, maybe there is another lost Bozo's Circus on there!", remarked Mr. Klein. Alas, but it was not to be.

Still, at least the tape wasn't blank. ;-)


According to the production slate held up at the beginning of this clip, this was recorded on October 25th 1963 for airing at a later date - which apparently was December 5th, if based on this being the ninth installment in the series according to the slate, and would be seen within the TV listings for the date in question.

This series - presented by ISMS in cooperation with the Illinois Department of Public Health - dealt with the specifics of emergency medical care and measures to survive national disasters, including the possibility of nuclear war. As this ad for the series at the point of its debut shows, it aired over the course of 16 weeks starting on Thursday, October 10th 1963, and was part of a free enrollment campaign to prepare people for emergencies ranging from minor to major.

Technical Note: The picture has some blank spots at each edge of the picture frame, almost circular in nature, as Dr. Klinghoffer is speaking. This is known as "overscanning," and was particularly omnipresent on old monochrome (black-and-white) TV cameras with four lenses mounted on a turret. This problem was noticeable on many old studio-based B&W shows that were fortunate enough to be preserved on videotape, but due to the fact that home TV screens only presented up to 90% of the picture (and that the picture tubes were more rounded), people watching at home would not have noticed. (Kinescopes did not necessarily show the entire picture as transmitted, like on this program.)

This part starts off with a brief shot of a nine-step greyscale pattern with approx. 350 Hz tone, followed by a floor director holding a production slate marked, "Medical Self-Help - ID #P-01217 - Prod's #9 - 10-25-63 - 29 min."

Opening title sequence with woman taking a baby in a crib (evidently a doll, and pre-recorded crying) and comforting him/her, and titles (with accompanying voiceover by ??):

"The Illinois State Medical Society, in cooperation with the Illinois Department of Public Health, presents Medical Self-Help Training. Another in a series of programs designed to teach you how to preserve life and health during time of national disaster or any medical emergency. Today's topic: "Infant and Child Care." With Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Disaster Medical Care Committee of the Illinois State Medical Society."

(Font Note: Except for the "Infant and Child care" title card which was set in Century Schoolbook, all other title cards were set in News Gothic.)

Dr. Klinghoffer starts off by announcing this edition will deal with nursing care and children "in the home under ordinary conditions" as well as "under disaster conditions [and] emergencies," and especially in the event of nuclear war. He divides his talk among certain groups: the newborn, the prematures (births of whom, he points out, increase in times of disaster), children from newborn to 1 year old, pre-schoolers, schoolchildren, and adolescents.

Having laid out this groundwork, Dr. Klinghoffer starts off this part by discussing the newborn, who at first appears red before fading to a "normal pink," but at times may have a "mottled" appearance due to uneven distribution of skin color especially around the hands and feet - which he describes as normal for newborns but not for older people. He also brings up "nervous reactions" in newborns, such as jerking around in responding to various stimuli, which he also characterizes as normal. He then discusses their breathing which is of the type that worries many young mothers, yellow discharge from the eyes that persists for a few days after birth, and black stool discharge - all of which he also describes as normal for newborns. He then discusses issues relating to newborn girls including white vaginal discharge, and breast enlargement and secretion, which he attributes to hormonal factors and also characterizes as normal. He emphasizes that newborns be kept warm and as clean as possible, then follows up with the subject of the difficulties of diapering in the event of a disaster, and suggests using toilet paper, tissues, paper napkins, torn cloth, sanitary napkins etc., in lieu of cloth diapers - but advises against using plastic due to the potential for suffocation. He then goes on to the stump of the umbilical cord which he say requires almost no attention; and requires that all newborns be isolated because of susceptibility to infection, which he acknowledges is a difficult task in event of a disaster. For feeding newborns, he cites breast feeding as the most practical under emergency and disaster conditions - and advises mothers should take necessary precautions before doing so to prevent possibility of infection. As he talks, a drawing of a mother breast-feeding her newborn is shown for a few seconds; he emphasizes the baby should be put "in position," and says some newborns' breast-feeding, depending on the situation, may require both breasts. He then discusses infant formula for when breast feeding is not sufficient; under disaster conditions, he recommends evaporated milk and water (which should be boiled and cooled beforehand), put into a sterilized bottle - with a woman shown preparing such formula as he describes what goes into it; he emphasizes the bottle should be kept in an inverted position. He also mentions that in disasters, there would be no refrigeration, so he advises against saving milk or formula for any future time, and recommends others in need of nutrition consume what is left after the baby is fed. After feeding, he says bottles should be cleaned with soap and water and then boiled for about 10 minutes (with nipples boiled for 3-5 minutes) - or, if in a shelter or under disaster conditions, just washed and then rinsed thoroughly.

" . . . remember that cleanliness is one of the best methods of preventive medicine."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Thursday, December 5th 1963 during the 8:30pm to 9pm timeframe.





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This rare surviving program from the early years of Chicago's "Window to the World" came directly from a 2" Quad tape that was found a few months ago in the basement archives of The Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC). On a recent visit, Rick Klein was touring the facility with head archivist of the MBC John Gieger, and they came upon an unlabeled Quad tape reel that had never been transferred. In a spirit of coorporation, Rick offered to have the tape transferred and for both museums to share the contents. "Who knows, maybe there is another lost Bozo's Circus on there!", remarked Mr. Klein. Alas, but it was not to be.

Still, at least the tape wasn't blank. ;-)


According to the production slate held up at the beginning of this clip, this was recorded on October 25th 1963 for airing at a later date - which apparently was December 5th, if based on this being the ninth installment in the series according to the slate, and would be seen within the TV listings for the date in question.

This series - presented by ISMS in cooperation with the Illinois Department of Public Health - dealt with the specifics of emergency medical care and measures to survive national disasters, including the possibility of nuclear war. As this ad for the series at the point of its debut shows, it aired over the course of 16 weeks starting on Thursday, October 10th 1963, and was part of a free enrollment campaign to prepare people for emergencies ranging from minor to major.

Technical Note: The picture has some blank spots at each edge of the picture frame, almost circular in nature, as Dr. Klinghoffer is speaking. This is known as "overscanning," and was particularly omnipresent on old monochrome (black-and-white) TV cameras with four lenses mounted on a turret. This problem was noticeable on many old studio-based B&W shows that were fortunate enough to be preserved on videotape, but due to the fact that home TV screens only presented up to 90% of the picture (and that the picture tubes were more rounded), people watching at home would not have noticed. (Kinescopes did not necessarily show the entire picture as transmitted, like on this program.)

This part starts off with a brief shot of a nine-step greyscale pattern with approx. 350 Hz tone, followed by a floor director holding a production slate marked, "Medical Self-Help - ID #P-01217 - Prod's #9 - 10-25-63 - 29 min."

Opening title sequence with woman taking a baby in a crib (evidently a doll, and pre-recorded crying) and comforting him/her, and titles (with accompanying voiceover by ??):

"The Illinois State Medical Society, in cooperation with the Illinois Department of Public Health, presents Medical Self-Help Training. Another in a series of programs designed to teach you how to preserve life and health during time of national disaster or any medical emergency. Today's topic: "Infant and Child Care." With Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Disaster Medical Care Committee of the Illinois State Medical Society."

(Font Note: Except for the "Infant and Child care" title card which was set in Century Schoolbook, all other title cards were set in News Gothic.)

Dr. Klinghoffer starts off by announcing this edition will deal with nursing care and children "in the home under ordinary conditions" as well as "under disaster conditions [and] emergencies," and especially in the event of nuclear war. He divides his talk among certain groups: the newborn, the prematures (births of whom, he points out, increase in times of disaster), children from newborn to 1 year old, pre-schoolers, schoolchildren, and adolescents.

Having laid out this groundwork, Dr. Klinghoffer starts off this part by discussing the newborn, who at first appears red before fading to a "normal pink," but at times may have a "mottled" appearance due to uneven distribution of skin color especially around the hands and feet - which he describes as normal for newborns but not for older people. He also brings up "nervous reactions" in newborns, such as jerking around in responding to various stimuli, which he also characterizes as normal. He then discusses their breathing which is of the type that worries many young mothers, yellow discharge from the eyes that persists for a few days after birth, and black stool discharge - all of which he also describes as normal for newborns. He then discusses issues relating to newborn girls including white vaginal discharge, and breast enlargement and secretion, which he attributes to hormonal factors and also characterizes as normal. He emphasizes that newborns be kept warm and as clean as possible, then follows up with the subject of the difficulties of diapering in the event of a disaster, and suggests using toilet paper, tissues, paper napkins, torn cloth, sanitary napkins etc., in lieu of cloth diapers - but advises against using plastic due to the potential for suffocation. He then goes on to the stump of the umbilical cord which he say requires almost no attention; and requires that all newborns be isolated because of susceptibility to infection, which he acknowledges is a difficult task in event of a disaster. For feeding newborns, he cites breast feeding as the most practical under emergency and disaster conditions - and advises mothers should take necessary precautions before doing so to prevent possibility of infection. As he talks, a drawing of a mother breast-feeding her newborn is shown for a few seconds; he emphasizes the baby should be put "in position," and says some newborns' breast-feeding, depending on the situation, may require both breasts. He then discusses infant formula for when breast feeding is not sufficient; under disaster conditions, he recommends evaporated milk and water (which should be boiled and cooled beforehand), put into a sterilized bottle - with a woman shown preparing such formula as he describes what goes into it; he emphasizes the bottle should be kept in an inverted position. He also mentions that in disasters, there would be no refrigeration, so he advises against saving milk or formula for any future time, and recommends others in need of nutrition consume what is left after the baby is fed. After feeding, he says bottles should be cleaned with soap and water and then boiled for about 10 minutes (with nipples boiled for 3-5 minutes) - or, if in a shelter or under disaster conditions, just washed and then rinsed thoroughly.

" . . . remember that cleanliness is one of the best methods of preventive medicine."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Thursday, December 5th 1963 during the 8:30pm to 9pm timeframe." /> Share

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