WTTW Channel 11 - Medical Self-Help Training - "Infant and Child Care" (Part 3, 1963)

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Here's Part 3 (the final part) of an edition of Medical Self-Help Training on WTTW Channel 11. This, the ninth of a total of 16 installments of an ongoing course about maintaining life and health in times of national disaster or emergencies, deals with the topic of "Infant and Child Care" and is hosted by Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Illinois State Medical Society's (ISMS) Disaster Medical Care Committee.

This was transferred directly from a 2" Quad tape, and was recorded on October 25th 1963.

In this part, Dr. Klinghoffer starts off by describing various techniques to be used in emergencies, and leads off with taking the temperature of patients which is done with a fever thermometer which differs from ordinary thermometers by a smaller mercury column, and staying at a certain temperature unless you shake the mercury down. As he points out, these special thermometers are rather fragile, made of glass with a tip containing the mercury, and it should be shaken down to room temperature before taking the patient's temperature (he demonstrates the proper technique for doing so). A closeup of one fever thermometer is shown for the purpose of explaining how they are to be read - which the doctor does anyway, in great detail. As part of his talk, he describes the variations in body temperature (a "diurnal variation," as he calls the proper terminology - and for which he uses his patented "perfectly normal" description) from the normal average 98.6 degrees, for example a child who went from a 103 degree fever to normal but then went below 98; he says that one's temperature varies up and down by a few percentage points over the course of a day - lower in the morning and higher in the evening. He also describes the various shapes and sizes of thermometer - anywhere from a long tip to a "stubby bulb," the latter of which he acknowledges is more preferred due to its sturdier make, and which he recommends to be used as rectal thermometers. He also recommends a three-minute duration for taking temperatures, and also after enough time after eating, drinking, smoking or going outside has passed. Next, he shows a large scale drawing of a thermometer to show how it works, the graph lines and what they represent, and how it is to be applied and read, with a line (representing the mercury) going up and down to show temperature fluctuations. He also demonstrates how to clean a thermometer (with cotton and soapy water - discard the cotton after cleaning), then rinse it (with water - discard the cotton afterward), repeat each procedure again, and finally dry it with a dry cotton - and always re-place it in its case. He then explains the different ways one can take temperature - rectally or on the armpit for younger or unconscious patients. He describes how to do rectal temperature tests (starting out by lubricating with petroleum jelly - as this is 1963, this is not shown on air) and then demonstrates the armpit (axillary) temperature-taking procedure. He notes that rectal temperatures are slightly higher than oral (or mouth) temperatures, and axillary temperatures are slightly lower. He emphasizes that the correct way to take temperatures is to insert from the bulb end, and recounts a true story about a crying baby whose temperature was taken by a mother who inserted the thermometer from the wrong end (though the baby was on the right end), which a doctor rectified - and the crying was due to the baby's being hungry, which was fixed after being fed from a bottle.

From there, the good doctor goes to describing the procedure for taking a pulse, which is taken at the base of the wrist in the radial artery. He gives a self-demonstration of how one takes a pulse (with a drawn line up his arm from above the base of his thumb), using a light touch with the index and middle finger. He describes normal pulse rates as 65-70 in men and 75-80 in women.

Next, he describes the procedure for measuring respiration, which he recommends by watching chest movements and breathing patterns for a minute - or having the patient put his hand on his chest and count by the up-and-down movements of his hand. He cites average respiration rate as 16-20 times per minute, with variations due to numerous factors. He concludes this lesson by briefly returning to the topic of diurnal variations in temperature, procedures for cleaning thermometers after use, and how long it is to be in place while taking temperatures.

Ending credits sequence (with "Staff of Aesculapius" [snake and stick] symbol inside state of Illinois positioned on right side of screen) (ending voiceover by ??):

"Today's program, 'Infant and Child Care,' was a presentation of the Illinois State Medical Society and the Illinois Department of Public Health. Your host has been Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Disaster Medical Committee of the Illinois State Medical Society. This was another in a series of programs presented on the subject of Medical Self-Help Training."

Set Design By James Swank
Produced by James Slawny
Directed by Ed Patino

Epilogue: Dr. Max Klinghoffer passed away on Wednesday, November 5th 2003. As his obituary notes, he was also known as "Dr. Sims" on a regular radio spot and numerous television tapings, giving medical advice.

Fuzzy Wishes To Thank:

Our own W.B. (William Brown) who wrote this exhaustive description.

Our own Phantom (Chris Tufts) who did research on the show dates and Dr. Klinghoffer.

Archivist John Gieger and The Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC) for allowing us to borrow the Quad tape for transferring and in letting us post the clips here.

"Remember also that there is a normal variation."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Thursday, December 5th 1963 during the 8:30pm to 9pm timeframe.





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This was transferred directly from a 2" Quad tape, and was recorded on October 25th 1963.

In this part, Dr. Klinghoffer starts off by describing various techniques to be used in emergencies, and leads off with taking the temperature of patients which is done with a fever thermometer which differs from ordinary thermometers by a smaller mercury column, and staying at a certain temperature unless you shake the mercury down. As he points out, these special thermometers are rather fragile, made of glass with a tip containing the mercury, and it should be shaken down to room temperature before taking the patient's temperature (he demonstrates the proper technique for doing so). A closeup of one fever thermometer is shown for the purpose of explaining how they are to be read - which the doctor does anyway, in great detail. As part of his talk, he describes the variations in body temperature (a "diurnal variation," as he calls the proper terminology - and for which he uses his patented "perfectly normal" description) from the normal average 98.6 degrees, for example a child who went from a 103 degree fever to normal but then went below 98; he says that one's temperature varies up and down by a few percentage points over the course of a day - lower in the morning and higher in the evening. He also describes the various shapes and sizes of thermometer - anywhere from a long tip to a "stubby bulb," the latter of which he acknowledges is more preferred due to its sturdier make, and which he recommends to be used as rectal thermometers. He also recommends a three-minute duration for taking temperatures, and also after enough time after eating, drinking, smoking or going outside has passed. Next, he shows a large scale drawing of a thermometer to show how it works, the graph lines and what they represent, and how it is to be applied and read, with a line (representing the mercury) going up and down to show temperature fluctuations. He also demonstrates how to clean a thermometer (with cotton and soapy water - discard the cotton after cleaning), then rinse it (with water - discard the cotton afterward), repeat each procedure again, and finally dry it with a dry cotton - and always re-place it in its case. He then explains the different ways one can take temperature - rectally or on the armpit for younger or unconscious patients. He describes how to do rectal temperature tests (starting out by lubricating with petroleum jelly - as this is 1963, this is not shown on air) and then demonstrates the armpit (axillary) temperature-taking procedure. He notes that rectal temperatures are slightly higher than oral (or mouth) temperatures, and axillary temperatures are slightly lower. He emphasizes that the correct way to take temperatures is to insert from the bulb end, and recounts a true story about a crying baby whose temperature was taken by a mother who inserted the thermometer from the wrong end (though the baby was on the right end), which a doctor rectified - and the crying was due to the baby's being hungry, which was fixed after being fed from a bottle.

From there, the good doctor goes to describing the procedure for taking a pulse, which is taken at the base of the wrist in the radial artery. He gives a self-demonstration of how one takes a pulse (with a drawn line up his arm from above the base of his thumb), using a light touch with the index and middle finger. He describes normal pulse rates as 65-70 in men and 75-80 in women.

Next, he describes the procedure for measuring respiration, which he recommends by watching chest movements and breathing patterns for a minute - or having the patient put his hand on his chest and count by the up-and-down movements of his hand. He cites average respiration rate as 16-20 times per minute, with variations due to numerous factors. He concludes this lesson by briefly returning to the topic of diurnal variations in temperature, procedures for cleaning thermometers after use, and how long it is to be in place while taking temperatures.

Ending credits sequence (with "Staff of Aesculapius" [snake and stick] symbol inside state of Illinois positioned on right side of screen) (ending voiceover by ??):

"Today's program, 'Infant and Child Care,' was a presentation of the Illinois State Medical Society and the Illinois Department of Public Health. Your host has been Dr. Max Klinghoffer, Chairman of the Disaster Medical Committee of the Illinois State Medical Society. This was another in a series of programs presented on the subject of Medical Self-Help Training."

Set Design By James Swank
Produced by James Slawny
Directed by Ed Patino

Epilogue: Dr. Max Klinghoffer passed away on Wednesday, November 5th 2003. As his obituary notes, he was also known as "Dr. Sims" on a regular radio spot and numerous television tapings, giving medical advice.

Fuzzy Wishes To Thank:

Our own W.B. (William Brown) who wrote this exhaustive description.

Our own Phantom (Chris Tufts) who did research on the show dates and Dr. Klinghoffer.

Archivist John Gieger and The Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC) for allowing us to borrow the Quad tape for transferring and in letting us post the clips here.

"Remember also that there is a normal variation."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Thursday, December 5th 1963 during the 8:30pm to 9pm timeframe." /> Share

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