WBBM Channel 2 - So You Think You Know Chicago? (Part 2, 1974)

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This clip made possible by the donations from our generous group of "Fuzzketeers" during the Spring 2012 Tape Transfer Fundraiser.

Here's Part 2 of a special called So You Think You Know Chicago? on WBBM Channel 2. This was the third broadcast in a continuing series of shows called Chicago Alive. The hosts were legendary anchors Bill Kurtis and Walter Jacobson, and the panel consisted of Chicago Sun-Times columnist and Kup's Show moderator Irv Kupcinet; Rev. Jesse Jackson of Operation PUSH; Miss USA 1973 Amanda Jones; and WGN Radio 720 personality Wally Phillips. Also featuring Lee Phillip. Includes:

Walter starts off this segment by posing a question pertinent to Rev. Jackson, via a filmed insert from Lee Phillip about the shortest and longest street in Chicago (Longmeadow Avenue, which Ms. Phillip referred to as "Longmeadow Street," was the shortest at 31.6 feet) - the question has to do with the name of longest street which runs from 7600 North to 119th Street South (23.5 miles). Jesse guesses State Street, Wally ventures it to be Western Avenue, and Kup chimes in with Elston, but Walter rules Wally's guess to be correct. The discussion then goes into Los Angeles streets, with Amanda noting that Wilshire Boulevard runs "70-something miles."

Bill poses the next question, pertaining to social activist and 1931 Nobel Peace Prize winner Jane Addams, as to what job she held with the city at that time. Amanda guesses that Ms. Addams was a ward administrator to "ride herd over" garbagemen, clean slums and fight landlords, but ultimately gave it up because of her settlement house activities; Bill rules Amanda's answer correct, and adds that Jane oversaw the 19th ward, before it was reconstituted as a political patronage job to shut her likes out.

Walter's next question is toward Wally, about Chicago labels - namely, the city's oldest company. Wally correctly guesses C.D. Peacock Jewelry, which was established in 1837 by English clockmaker and repairman Elijah Peacock and his brothers (and is still in business today). Its first location was on Lake Street, with a picture of the original building being shown.

Bill orients his next question towards Kup about Lincoln Park, a former cemetery whose graves were removed starting in the 1860's but for a few. Another filmed insert from Ms. Phillip gives background as to one of the remaining graves - a stone on the Clark Street side for David Kennison, a soldier in the Revolutionary War (fighting in the battles of Lexington and Concord) who'd died in 1852 at age 115. This question pertains to which famous battle he participated in. Kup rightly notes that Kennison was the last surviving member of the Boston Tea Party of 1873, whose anniversary had recently been celebrated by that city. Jesse then makes a joke about a running score which generates laughs from the audience. Bill concludes this round by noting that Kennison took some of the tea from that event back with him to Chicago.

Walter's next question relates to the Prohibition era. After mentioning that the city, as of the end of 1973, had 6,884 licensed establishments serving liquor, he asks the panel how many speakeasies operated in Cook County during Prohibition. Rev. Jackson ventures there were more illegal speakeasies then than legal licensed establishments at the time of airing of this show, but doesn't cite a figure. Walter rules the good reverend's answer correct - and verifies that indeed, there was no verifiable figure on the amount of speakeasies during Prohibition, but approximates that 7,000 were in operation. With that comes the next commercial break, and a shot of the audience with another Marconi Mark VII camera peering out.

Commercial: Continental Bank at La Salle and Jackson, with longtime Chicago TV and radio personality Alex Dreier - starting off by showing an area of Chicago which changed over the years but for the water tower, and going from there to the various banking services offered - with an animated appearance by Connie the Kangaroo and Baby at the end - "The Big Bank with the Little Bank Inside"

Commercial: Ford Team's Great Small Car Variety Show, with offers on Pinto, Mustang II (with two models) and Maverick (with three models) - featuring Melody Rogers and Abe Gibron (coach of the Chicago Bears from 1972 to 1974)

Commercial: Coca-Cola - starting off with history lesson about its start and the legion of imitators that came in its wake, and going on to the number who still drink Coke today - "It's the Real Thing"

"It's more fun to do wrong."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Monday, March 25th 1974 during the 8pm to 9pm timeframe.


Date Uploaded: 06/20/2012

Tags: 1970s   WBBM Channel 2   Mostly Content   Full Commercial Breaks     




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Spring 2012 Tape Transfer Fundraiser.

Here's Part 2 of a special called So You Think You Know Chicago? on WBBM Channel 2. This was the third broadcast in a continuing series of shows called Chicago Alive. The hosts were legendary anchors Bill Kurtis and Walter Jacobson, and the panel consisted of Chicago Sun-Times columnist and Kup's Show moderator Irv Kupcinet; Rev. Jesse Jackson of Operation PUSH; Miss USA 1973 Amanda Jones; and WGN Radio 720 personality Wally Phillips. Also featuring Lee Phillip. Includes:

Walter starts off this segment by posing a question pertinent to Rev. Jackson, via a filmed insert from Lee Phillip about the shortest and longest street in Chicago (Longmeadow Avenue, which Ms. Phillip referred to as "Longmeadow Street," was the shortest at 31.6 feet) - the question has to do with the name of longest street which runs from 7600 North to 119th Street South (23.5 miles). Jesse guesses State Street, Wally ventures it to be Western Avenue, and Kup chimes in with Elston, but Walter rules Wally's guess to be correct. The discussion then goes into Los Angeles streets, with Amanda noting that Wilshire Boulevard runs "70-something miles."

Bill poses the next question, pertaining to social activist and 1931 Nobel Peace Prize winner Jane Addams, as to what job she held with the city at that time. Amanda guesses that Ms. Addams was a ward administrator to "ride herd over" garbagemen, clean slums and fight landlords, but ultimately gave it up because of her settlement house activities; Bill rules Amanda's answer correct, and adds that Jane oversaw the 19th ward, before it was reconstituted as a political patronage job to shut her likes out.

Walter's next question is toward Wally, about Chicago labels - namely, the city's oldest company. Wally correctly guesses C.D. Peacock Jewelry, which was established in 1837 by English clockmaker and repairman Elijah Peacock and his brothers (and is still in business today). Its first location was on Lake Street, with a picture of the original building being shown.

Bill orients his next question towards Kup about Lincoln Park, a former cemetery whose graves were removed starting in the 1860's but for a few. Another filmed insert from Ms. Phillip gives background as to one of the remaining graves - a stone on the Clark Street side for David Kennison, a soldier in the Revolutionary War (fighting in the battles of Lexington and Concord) who'd died in 1852 at age 115. This question pertains to which famous battle he participated in. Kup rightly notes that Kennison was the last surviving member of the Boston Tea Party of 1873, whose anniversary had recently been celebrated by that city. Jesse then makes a joke about a running score which generates laughs from the audience. Bill concludes this round by noting that Kennison took some of the tea from that event back with him to Chicago.

Walter's next question relates to the Prohibition era. After mentioning that the city, as of the end of 1973, had 6,884 licensed establishments serving liquor, he asks the panel how many speakeasies operated in Cook County during Prohibition. Rev. Jackson ventures there were more illegal speakeasies then than legal licensed establishments at the time of airing of this show, but doesn't cite a figure. Walter rules the good reverend's answer correct - and verifies that indeed, there was no verifiable figure on the amount of speakeasies during Prohibition, but approximates that 7,000 were in operation. With that comes the next commercial break, and a shot of the audience with another Marconi Mark VII camera peering out.

Commercial: Continental Bank at La Salle and Jackson, with longtime Chicago TV and radio personality Alex Dreier - starting off by showing an area of Chicago which changed over the years but for the water tower, and going from there to the various banking services offered - with an animated appearance by Connie the Kangaroo and Baby at the end - "The Big Bank with the Little Bank Inside"

Commercial: Ford Team's Great Small Car Variety Show, with offers on Pinto, Mustang II (with two models) and Maverick (with three models) - featuring Melody Rogers and Abe Gibron (coach of the Chicago Bears from 1972 to 1974)

Commercial: Coca-Cola - starting off with history lesson about its start and the legion of imitators that came in its wake, and going on to the number who still drink Coke today - "It's the Real Thing"

"It's more fun to do wrong."

This aired on local Chicago TV on Monday, March 25th 1974 during the 8pm to 9pm timeframe." /> Share

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