WBBM Channel 2 - So You Think You Know Chicago? (Part 3, 1974)

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This clip made possible by the donations from our generous group of "Fuzzketeers" during the Spring 2012 Tape Transfer Fundraiser.

Here's Part 3 of a special called So You Think You Know Chicago? on WBBM Channel 2. This was the third broadcast in a continuing series of shows called Chicago Alive. The hosts were legendary anchors Bill Kurtis and Walter Jacobson, and the panel consisted of Chicago Sun-Times columnist and Kup's Show moderator Irv Kupcinet; Rev. Jesse Jackson of Operation PUSH; Miss USA 1973 Amanda Jones; and WGN Radio 720 personality Wally Phillips. Also featuring John Drummond, John Callaway and Lee Phillip. Includes:

Bill starts off this segment by mentioning to Rev. Jackson that, of the nine questions posed thus far, seven have been answered correctly. His next question relates to a Prohibition-era speakeasy hostess and Chicago legend who came from Waco, Texas to study singing under a Marshall Field scholarship, held court at the Green Mill Gardens at Broadway and Lawrence, and popularized such phrases as "Hello, sucker!" and "Never give a sucker an even break" (a film clip of this lady is shown as Bill relates her story) - Amanda mentions her own name in jest, then admits to being stumped; Kup correctly guesses the answer to be Mary Louise Cecilia "Texas" Guinan. After Wally tells one of his stories, Bill name-drops Bob and Betty Sanders.

Walter then poses the next Prohibition-era question (or as he puts it, "Prohibition area"), pertaining to Al Capone, courtesy of a filmed insert from John Drummond outside an old hotel at 23rd and Michigan which was the Capone mob's headquarters, with a shot of his old bedroom which has deteriorated in the years since he last resided there, and a wire room in the basement - the question is what was that hotel's name? Wally starts off by saying he used to deliver "funny suitcases" to Len O'Connor at that hotel, and then correctly gives its name as the Metropole. Kup then mentions that the Four Deuces was at 2222 South State, and Walter opines that the Metropole, and especially Capone's old room, should have been made a landmark. Kup then goes on to recount Capone's legend, and Wally mentions that Capone's business card listed him as a "real estate salesman."

Bill's next question pertains to the date of October 8th 1871 - the day of the Great Chicago Fire, as well as another fire out in a Wisconsin town that killed 12 and devastated 1,280,000 acres - the question has to do with that Wisconsin town's name. Kup guesses Ogden, and Wally (correctly) gives his answer as Peshtigo, named after the Peshtigo River. Virtually no news of that other fire came out at the time because the main telegraph building was one of the first to catch fire. The owner of the sawmill factory in Peshtigo was a former mayor of Chicago, William Ogden.

Walter then introduces a piece from John Callaway about the "Great Chicago Air Raid Warning Question," relating to a warning on September 22nd 1959 at 10:30pm that led to mass panic among Chicagoans, and what triggered that warning. Rev. Jackson rightly cites the sirens' activation as having heralded the Chicago White Sox' winning the American League pennant, on orders from Fire Commissioner Robert J. Quinn. Amanda then notes that lower-income residents recognized the sirens as signifying the White Sox' event, while higher-income and better-educated North Shore residents "freaked out," coming as it did during the height of the Cold War.

Bill's next question pertains to the codes of area airports (with a graphic featuring the baggage check tags "CHI," "ORD" and "OHA" shown on a chroma-key screen next to him), more specifically why O'Hare Airport's tag reads "ORD." Amanda says it had to do with the airport's original name of Orchard Field which started out as an airstrip during World War II, and Jesse mentions the FAA's reluctance to change airport call letters except for one time when New York's Idlewild Airport was renamed after President John F. Kennedy. Amanda's answer is deemed correct.

Walter then goes to a question about Chicago's reputation in the field of medicine, leading to Lee Phillip in surgical garb inside an operating room at a famous South Side hospital founded in 1891 by Dr. Daniel Hale Williams (1858-1931), the first black to be a member of the American College of Physicians and the first doctor to perform successful open-heart surgery (in 1893). Her question has to do with this hospital's name. Wally first gives a "humorous" answer of Orchard Field, but in the end guesses Provident Hospital, which Jesse seconds and Walter rules correct.

Bill then goes back to John Drummond who is now under the city, at a tunnel where an electric railway once throve in the 1920s in what is (as of the airing of this show) deserted and dark, and what had originally been built to house telephone lines - his question is which area he is under, to which Kup asserts that the tunnel is under the Loop and the railway was for delivering coal to the various department stores in that section. Wally humorously mentions that the tunnel could be connected from Hugh Hefner's Playboy headquarters to Pepsi-Cola's bottling plant. Bill shows a picture of the tunnel in its 1920s heyday, confirming Kup's answer. This part ends with that final answer.

This aired on local Chicago TV on Monday, March 25th 1974 during the 8pm to 9pm timeframe.


Date Uploaded: 06/20/2012

Tags: 1970s   WBBM Channel 2   Mostly Content     




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Spring 2012 Tape Transfer Fundraiser.

Here's Part 3 of a special called So You Think You Know Chicago? on WBBM Channel 2. This was the third broadcast in a continuing series of shows called Chicago Alive. The hosts were legendary anchors Bill Kurtis and Walter Jacobson, and the panel consisted of Chicago Sun-Times columnist and Kup's Show moderator Irv Kupcinet; Rev. Jesse Jackson of Operation PUSH; Miss USA 1973 Amanda Jones; and WGN Radio 720 personality Wally Phillips. Also featuring John Drummond, John Callaway and Lee Phillip. Includes:

Bill starts off this segment by mentioning to Rev. Jackson that, of the nine questions posed thus far, seven have been answered correctly. His next question relates to a Prohibition-era speakeasy hostess and Chicago legend who came from Waco, Texas to study singing under a Marshall Field scholarship, held court at the Green Mill Gardens at Broadway and Lawrence, and popularized such phrases as "Hello, sucker!" and "Never give a sucker an even break" (a film clip of this lady is shown as Bill relates her story) - Amanda mentions her own name in jest, then admits to being stumped; Kup correctly guesses the answer to be Mary Louise Cecilia "Texas" Guinan. After Wally tells one of his stories, Bill name-drops Bob and Betty Sanders.

Walter then poses the next Prohibition-era question (or as he puts it, "Prohibition area"), pertaining to Al Capone, courtesy of a filmed insert from John Drummond outside an old hotel at 23rd and Michigan which was the Capone mob's headquarters, with a shot of his old bedroom which has deteriorated in the years since he last resided there, and a wire room in the basement - the question is what was that hotel's name? Wally starts off by saying he used to deliver "funny suitcases" to Len O'Connor at that hotel, and then correctly gives its name as the Metropole. Kup then mentions that the Four Deuces was at 2222 South State, and Walter opines that the Metropole, and especially Capone's old room, should have been made a landmark. Kup then goes on to recount Capone's legend, and Wally mentions that Capone's business card listed him as a "real estate salesman."

Bill's next question pertains to the date of October 8th 1871 - the day of the Great Chicago Fire, as well as another fire out in a Wisconsin town that killed 12 and devastated 1,280,000 acres - the question has to do with that Wisconsin town's name. Kup guesses Ogden, and Wally (correctly) gives his answer as Peshtigo, named after the Peshtigo River. Virtually no news of that other fire came out at the time because the main telegraph building was one of the first to catch fire. The owner of the sawmill factory in Peshtigo was a former mayor of Chicago, William Ogden.

Walter then introduces a piece from John Callaway about the "Great Chicago Air Raid Warning Question," relating to a warning on September 22nd 1959 at 10:30pm that led to mass panic among Chicagoans, and what triggered that warning. Rev. Jackson rightly cites the sirens' activation as having heralded the Chicago White Sox' winning the American League pennant, on orders from Fire Commissioner Robert J. Quinn. Amanda then notes that lower-income residents recognized the sirens as signifying the White Sox' event, while higher-income and better-educated North Shore residents "freaked out," coming as it did during the height of the Cold War.

Bill's next question pertains to the codes of area airports (with a graphic featuring the baggage check tags "CHI," "ORD" and "OHA" shown on a chroma-key screen next to him), more specifically why O'Hare Airport's tag reads "ORD." Amanda says it had to do with the airport's original name of Orchard Field which started out as an airstrip during World War II, and Jesse mentions the FAA's reluctance to change airport call letters except for one time when New York's Idlewild Airport was renamed after President John F. Kennedy. Amanda's answer is deemed correct.

Walter then goes to a question about Chicago's reputation in the field of medicine, leading to Lee Phillip in surgical garb inside an operating room at a famous South Side hospital founded in 1891 by Dr. Daniel Hale Williams (1858-1931), the first black to be a member of the American College of Physicians and the first doctor to perform successful open-heart surgery (in 1893). Her question has to do with this hospital's name. Wally first gives a "humorous" answer of Orchard Field, but in the end guesses Provident Hospital, which Jesse seconds and Walter rules correct.

Bill then goes back to John Drummond who is now under the city, at a tunnel where an electric railway once throve in the 1920s in what is (as of the airing of this show) deserted and dark, and what had originally been built to house telephone lines - his question is which area he is under, to which Kup asserts that the tunnel is under the Loop and the railway was for delivering coal to the various department stores in that section. Wally humorously mentions that the tunnel could be connected from Hugh Hefner's Playboy headquarters to Pepsi-Cola's bottling plant. Bill shows a picture of the tunnel in its 1920s heyday, confirming Kup's answer. This part ends with that final answer.

This aired on local Chicago TV on Monday, March 25th 1974 during the 8pm to 9pm timeframe." /> Share

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